Truth Comes To Us With Joy

Pentecost  May 20, 2018

Acts 2:1-11;  Psalms 104; 1 Corinthians 12:3b-7, 12-13;  John 15:26-27, 16:12-15

 

This is probably my favorite Sunday of the year. That may seem like a strange thing to say, given most people would choose Christmas or Easter.  But when you think about it, Christmas is the birth of Jesus, the joyful day we celebrate that God came to earth to be with us.   And Pentecost is the day that the Holy Spirit came to be with us on earth.

So why did the Holy Spirit come and what does the Holy Spirit do? Good questions!

Jesus says that the Holy Spirit is the Spirit of truth and that the Spirit comes to us personally to tell us the truth. The Holy Spirit is the “Advocate”.  That title gives us some clues of what the Spirit does.  An advocate is a supporter or defender.  When we are having a difficult time, it’s really good to have a supporter.  A supporter tells you the truth about how you’re doing.  A supporter says things like, “That was really good.  Your hard work is really paying off and you’re really improving.”  A defender says things like, “Don’t worry about someone laughing at you.  You’re doing the right thing.  I will stand with you no matter what.” We all need supporters and defenders in our life.

An advocate also does things like ask if we can have a second chance to do something. An advocate really believes that we can learn to do things right after we have made a mess of something.  An Advocate prays and intercedes for us.

Let’s look more closely at our Gospel. Jesus says that the Spirit “proceeds from the Father.”  This is not to be confused with the theology of our Apostle’s Creed.  The point of what he is saying here is that the disciples… and all Christians… need the help of the Spirit as we share the Gospel in the world around us.  The Spirit “will testify” the truth to Jesus, and the disciples “will (also) testify” the truth to everyone around them – because they had heard the truth directly from Jesus all the time they had been with him.  We then carry that Truth forward, generation to generation.  WE can testify/ give witness/ share this truth because the Spirit is sent to us to personally tell us the Truth.

In Acts 1:8 Jesus says, “You shall receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you, and you will be my witnesses.” The image that comes to mind is one of being in court on the witness stand, having sworn on the Bible to tell the truth. We live in the “court” of the world, where we are witnesses about the Truth of Jesus.  We can do this with confidence only because we have the assurance that the Spirit does not speak on its own.  What the Spirit speaks is exactly what the Creator has spoken.

When Jesus tells us that the Spirit “will declare to you the things that are coming,” he is telling us in yet another way that the truth the Spirit tells us is from God. There are many verses in the Old Testament, such as Isaiah 46:9, which state that only God can declare the future.  Declaring things to come is not a privilege that false gods have.  An example is the dream Joseph had to take Mary and the Christ child to Egypt; God knew that Bethlehem would not be a safe place for them in the near future.

Jesus really presses this all home as he prepares to leave his disciples.   It would be normal and natural if we felt we could not possibly understand everything we need to know to share the Truth of God fully and correctly.  And Jesus assured the disciples, that there was more to know; he said, (there is) “much more” or “still many things” to learn, and we are just not able to learn it all at once.  That is why the Spirit stays with us, to guide us along the “way of truth”, reminding us that Jesus told us, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life.” (John 14:6)

We cannot begin to understand or even image all that Jesus did for us, until we live our lives, mature, experience many things, pray, and study the scriptures. As we grow in our faith, we grow in our ability to understand what seemed impossible when we were children or new in the faith.  “I have more to tell you” is a promise that we will have a deeper and fuller faith as time passes.  The things we cannot accept at one time are the things we may find to be a source of real consolation later.  God knows and has always known all truth; we struggle to grasp truth by bits and pieces at a time.  The Spirit is there to give us the precise truth we need at the moment we need it.  We might think of it in terms of always being fed the ideal food our bodies need in the exact way we will most enjoy at every single meal.

Then Jesus says, “(The Spirit) will glorify me, because he will take from what is mine and declare it you. I get confused when I read that.  When we glorify someone, we given them honor or high praise; it also means to worship someone as greater than ourselves.  We make clear our praise by doing something people can hear or see, like clapping our hands or bowing, by giving our very best things as a gift.  We glorify God when we worship, by kneeling or bowing or giving thanks, and also by sharing what we believe with other people and encouraging them to glorify God.  Likewise, the Spirit glorifies Christ by sharing with us the truth that we in turn share with our neighbors.  It becomes, not a duty or a burden, but a great honor and a privilege to be able to share the faith.

And this completes a pattern we have seen over the last three weeks. 2 weeks ago we talked about being chosen by God and remaining in Jesus.  Last week we read that as Jesus ascended, he told us to “Go into the whole world and proclaim the gospel to every creature.”  Now, Jesus sends us the Spirit from God to better enable us to awaken our neighbors that they too have been chosen.  The Spirit remains with us so that we might grow in awareness of the teachings of Jesus and the fullness of truth in God.  In turn, we honor God as the Spirit honors Jesus.

May the truth which the Spirit speaks to you fill you with joy.

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Chosen to Remain

6th Sunday of  Easter, May 6, 2018

Acts 10:25-26, 34-35, 44-48; Ps 98:1-4; 1 John 4:7-10; John 15:9-17

 

I would like to focus today on just two words in our Gospel reading. The first word we will focus on is “chose”, in the next to the last sentence: “It was not you who chose me but I who chose you…”

The first thing that comes to my mind is when we played kick ball in elementary school gym class. Two team captains would be chosen by the gym teacher.  Then those team captains would take turns choosing kids to be on their team.  Me? Well, I was never big or strong or very good at sports.   Both captains, of course wanted a team that could win the game.  So, I was always one of the last ones chosen.

We often choose our friends because they will agree with us or share their candy bars with us, and it is easy to think God chose us because we remembered to say our prayers or we didn’t say bad words. Some people might even think that they are like team captains and they are in charge of doing the choosing.  They might feel like Jesus is sitting around, waiting for them to choose him.

But instead, Jesus tells us that He already chose us. It would seem that he chose us even before we were born. St Paul wrote in Ephesians 1: 4 that Jesus chose us before the beginning of the world, that we should be holy and without sin.  This is far, far different from the idea of Jesus waiting for us, or even thinking it was just “luck” that we were chosen.  That’s not how God works.  God chooses each and every person, and loves each person as if they were the only person. In fact, God chooses us all.  In the very first sentence of our reading Jesus says, “As God loves me, so I also love you.”  Jesus was talking to all of his disciples, and he is talking to all of us.  God loves each and every person, each one in their own way, and since God is love and love is from God and God created love (that is in the 2nd reading), God is able to- and chooses to – love each and every person.

The second word we are going to focus on today is “remain.” In the Gospel, Jesus says, “Remain in me, and I remain in you.”  We might say, “Remain with me, stick around for I while, I like being with you.”   But that isn’t quite the same thing.  Think of this, we sometimes say, “I am really into ice hockey.  My favorite team is the Capitals and I am so into watching every single game.”  We want to “remain” in front of the TV during all the playoff games, eating in front of the TV, wearing our team jersey, thinking “hockey, hockey, hockey!”

Ah, now it makes sense, Jesus wants us to love him that much, that we always think about Jesus, Jesus, Jesus! We always want to be with Jesus, we want to learn more about Jesus, we want to read about Jesus, we want to talk to other people about Jesus because we are so in to Jesus….and that is the way Jesus feels about us.  Jesus is the friend who never moves away, never forgets, never likes someone else better, always tells us the truth, and forever loves us.  Jesus remains in our lives, even when we miss the puck by a mile.

I knew a man once who had trouble loving. The presents he gave his wife that were things that he wanted.  He never bought her things she wanted.  For Christmas he bought her a vacuum cleaner, because he wanted her to keep the house clean.  He bought her a waffle maker for Valentines Day because he wanted her to make waffles for his breakfast.  For her birthday he bought her a big new TV so he could watch hockey.  He didn’t understand why she was so mad at him.  So she made a rule: he couldn’t give her any gifts that had an electric cord, no gifts that could be plugged in.  Gifts had to be jewelry or flowers or things that were for her to enjoy.

Jesus gave us a rule, too, to help us understand. Here is the rule:  “Love one another.”  It’s the last sentence of our reading.  It is a very simple rule, just three words.  But now that we understand about God and Jesus and love, it might not sound so easy to do, because the rule says we have to love people who might not love us back, or people who aren’t very loveable.  It doesn’t mean they’re our best friends and we want to hang out with them, but it means we have to be kind, be generous, pray for them, maybe even listen to them talk when we don’t necessarily agree with them.  Maybe give them a pencil in math class when they don’t have one, knowing they wouldn’t do the same for us.  Maybe you can pick them for your team, to give them a chance to play.  Maybe you can stand up for them when your friends are picking on them.  We can love them like God loves – love them when they need love, not just when they deserve it.

So here is what we learned today: You have been chosen by God, and God loves you with a love beyond your imagination. Jesus will remain in you, and wants you to remain in him.  The way to remain in Jesus is to love Jesus, and love other people, too.

Another View of Easter

 

4th Sunday Easter, April 22, 2018

Acts 4:8-12;  Psalm 118;  1 John 3: 1-2;  John 10: 11-18

 

Today, we look again at Easter, starting with the Gospel of John. John inserted teaching dialogues by Jesus between some of the action scenes. The teaching we read is about Jesus’ coming death in terms of “The Good Shepherd”, which then leads into Jesus raising Lazarus from the dead. John, you see, identifies the raising of Lazarus as the turning point when the High Priests began to plot to kill Jesus. These scenes flow together to build up to the crucifixion. We are doing exactly what the disciples did after Easter –looking back at what Jesus taught, and discovering new meaning in the light of the Resurrection.

Here are the key Gospel verses: “A good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. I am the good shepherd and I will lay down my life for the sheep. This is why the Father loves me, because I lay down my life in order to take it up again. No one takes it from me, but I lay it down on my own.”

Background: Palestine is at the intersection of Asia, Europe and Africa, so there are many large wild predators – Persian Lions, Cheetahs, Lynx, and leopards. A shepherd would have good reason to protect himself, to allow these fierce cats to take a sheep, and not try to intervene. The people understood the grave danger of being a shepherd. In this passage, Jesus repeats his promise to lay down his life for the sheep 3 times; making a sacred oath that he will give his life for us.

Notice that Jesus does not put limitations on this oath. It’s not, “if” the sheep is well behaved or “if” it is obedient. In fact, there are no “If” clauses in the promise. We are given this loving protection without reservation. Those listening to Jesus, not realizing he was talking about people, found this promise extravagant and unnatural.

Our 1st reading is a continuation from the Book of Acts we have been reading since Easter. Acts is a thriller; it is high drama, with conflict and death. It is a coming of age story for the disciples. It is an exciting history of the early church. It is a self improvement book, a great stand-alone read.

Anyway, today we read the 3rd of Peter’s sermons. The 1st was at Pentecost, the 2nd was when Peter healed a man crippled from birth and was arrested for healing him. This 3rd sermon is Peter responding to the charges of the High Priests the following day. You immediately notice how bold and articulate Peter is. He is no longer the rough fisherman who denied Christ on Good Friday and fearfully hid in the locked room on Saturday. He is “Peter infused with the Holy Spirit” now.

Peter starts by telling the High Priests that the cripple was healed in the Name of Jesus (get that – merely the name has power to heal), AND that Jesus has risen from the dead. That blast of information is enough to knock the High Priests off their feet. Then Peter quotes Scripture, just as Jesus would have.

He bases his argument in Psalm 118, which shows the High Priests that they have made a terrible error in judgment. They have rejected the very person and the salvation promised in yet another promise, by God, long ago in a Psalm of King David. Jesus is the very cornerstone, the support piece on which rests our salvation. Jesus is the “promised one”. Our lectionary does not include the Priests’ response; you can read it on your own.

But our lectionary does give us part of Psalm 118. If you were a youth group, I would have scripts with your parts identified by speaker so that you could act this out. It is a beautiful piece of ancient liturgy; this is dramatic liturgy at its best, with speaking parts for the priests, the people and the king. It was written for the occasion of a great victory, a celebration which proclaimed God as their strength in danger. Each speaker proclaims God’s mercy, and there is testimony of how God saved them from what seemed to be certain death. They were surrounded on every side in battle – the “enemy encompassed me like bees”, the King says. “They flared up like fire among thorns. I was hard pressed and was falling, but the Lord helped me.” Who has not felt like that at some time in their life?   Who has never felt overwhelmed and that their problems were greater than their strength?

But the Lord makes the tiny and weak victorious over evil and death, just as the Lord had brought tiny Israel, overwhelmed by larger and greater forces, to military victory. At that time, Israel thought it was the rejected stone. But now we understand the one who was rejected as Jesus.   And Jesus has become the anchoring base for our lives, our church, and our world. “This,” the king in the Psalm announced, “is the day the Lord has made,” using the same expression we use to announce Easter. The priests respond to the king with a blessing: “Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good.” We make church relevant when we see and celebrate the movement of God in our own lives, here and today in our liturgy.

So Jesus has told us that we are of great value to him, so much so that he will suffer and die for us. Realizing that Jesus is alive, Peter is filled with the Spirit of God, boldly preaching that Jesus loves us and protects us from evil. Peter confidently places his own life and well-being in Jesus’ hands. And the Psalm assures us that God has loved and protected believers from long ago. These readings give us another viewpoint of the meaning of this Easter Season and why we celebrate it with such great joy.

The Metanoia Road

3rd Sunday of Easter, April 15, 201818

Acts 3: 13-15,17-19;  Psalm 4: 2-9;  1John 2: 1-5,  Luke 24: 35-48

I will go out on a limb a little here, and hope that most everyone knows the story in Luke about “the Road to Emmaus”. It’s all in the very last chapter of Luke’s Gospel. Luke tells about a group of at least 5 women finding the tomb open and empty on Easter morning. They told the apostles, but the men did not believe them. That same day, two of Jesus’ followers left Jerusalem and started out, feeling sad and discouraged, on the 7 mile walk to Emmaus. Jesus joined them on their walk, but they didn’t recognize him. Jesus then interpreted the scriptures to them, explaining all that Moses and the many prophets had fore-told about him.

When they arrived at Emmaus, the men eagerly invited him to sit down to eat with them. But when Jesus took the bread and blessed it, they suddenly recognized him, and he disappeared. Usually we end the story with the verse “Did not our hearts burn within us while he talked and opened to us the scriptures?” But that is not the end of the story. Our Gospel today is what immediately follows.

Much of the time Jesus spent on earth, as the “historical Jesus” in the Gospels, he spent physically moving about. In a different way, he moved people around a lot too. He moved them from pain and disability to health. He moved people from doubt to belief. He moved people from confusion to clarity. He moved people from sin to grace and mercy. He moved those fishermen right into being fishers of people.

I would define a church as a group of people who want to be moved to love more, to be kinder and more compassionate, to being more generous, to better understanding the Risen Christ in their own lives. And when people choose to make their church a place of that type of movement, something else happens. People want to help other people, people outside of their church group, to move closer to Christ and make all those other good moves, too. And all the people begin to understand that this journey we are on moves along easier with a better understanding of Scripture. It just makes sense to follow Jesus’ lead on this!

So when the two men return to Jerusalem from Emmaus, they share their experience with the Risen Lord with the apostles and other disciples, when suddenly Jesus appears in the room. They don’t understand; they are terrified and Jesus has to show them his hands and feet and have them touch him, and he eats some fish in front of them to prove he is real. And once again, he explains the scriptures. He continues this time, and reminds them that he had told them it was their job now to teach repentance, for the forgiveness of sins must be preached in his name to all the nations.

But we have a language problem. “Repent” seems to imply that we have already done something wrong, regret it, and now want to behave differently. But Biblically, this is not all there is to it. In the gospels, the Greek word used for repentance is metanoia. Literally this means to do an about face, to turn around, to face in an entirely new direction.

So, metanoia means to move us beyond our present mindset, beyond our present way of thinking.  To repent is to let the soul, which is the image and likeness of God within us, re-configure us so that we are so overwhelmed with compassion and love that indeed we do turn and change how we think, how we understand, how we order our priorities, and how we react.  We must move past regret focused on our mistakes, and respond like Peter, in our first reading.  He meets some of those men who coerced Pilate into killing an innocent Jesus merely to make the social, economic, and political structure of the day benefit them a little longer.

Amazingly, Peter was so filled with compassion and love that he would joyfully lead them to repent and have their sins wiped away. The Catholic Church leadership was traditionally rooted in Peter, who clearly understood deeply and acted out “All Are Welcome Here – even the murderers of Jesus.”   It is a tradition to be proud of, and continued; to welcome man or woman, clean or addict, poor or rich, whatever color or race or sexual orientation, political affiliation, education level, ignorance quotient and so on and so on.  Only metanoia-style repentance can produce that level of welcome.

By now it is becoming clear that Jesus’ followers have to change. They no longer can be just followers of Jesus. They must begin to preach the Good News of Forgiveness and New Life in Christ. For mature Christians, Scripture and the Eucharist are sources of the necessary strength and connection with Jesus. That is what Jesus left his disciples. But many people today have never studied Scripture or been taught the meaning of the Eucharist. And those people will be the next generation of the church only if we want them to join us on our journey down the metanoia road.

Think about how those disciples felt that night, together with the Risen Christ. What is it they will go and do as a result of this experience? They will build a new “Way” for believers to worship and act out in faith. How were their lives different than before? They become bold and articulate, eager for difficult challenges. The life journey of those two men going to Emmaus Easter Day was certainly very different than the one they had planned. Spiritual leadership is about taking people on a journey, and every single Christian must participate fully in spiritual leadership before their joy will be full. What will be your first step on this journey? Where will you begin?

Looking for Joy

4th Sun Lent 3-11-18

2 Chronicles 36:14-16; 19-23 Ps: 137:1- 6; Ephesians 2:4-10; John 3:14-21

 

I struggled for days with this ….I wrote at least 3 different homilies…all of which ended in the recycle bin. Be glad!  Then I had an altogether brilliant idea.

Actually, it wasn’t the idea that was so brilliant. It was the color of these vestments that was brilliant.  Whew!  Rose with a glow! What is the point of this rose?  This happens twice a year, once during Advent and once during Lent.  It is the half way mark in those liturgical seasons.  It is when the mood lightens at little.  It is Joy breaking through the somber tone of the waiting in Advent, breaking through the examination of our lives and our faith in Lent.  But why joy??   The “why” of the joy never sticks in my brain quite as well as “the what”.

So we look for joy in the readings. The first reading is about how the people of Judah lost their faith and ended up captives in Babylon.  Nothing so joyful there (but they do finally return home).  The Psalm is a lament, a song of loss and regret, grieving for the city of Jerusalem, which has been destroyed. No joy there.

Ah, but we have the 2nd reading, from St. Paul, who was writing the Good News of the Resurrection to people in the city of Ephesus.  They were hearing this for the first time!  Perhaps, just perhaps, we could put ourselves in that frame of mind, and see if we can find the joy there that seems to elude us.

So, what does Paul say? First thing is that God is rich in mercy.  Mercy, as we talked about 2 weeks ago, is when God does not give us what we deserve.  We sin, we fail, we do what we know we shouldn’t do, we don’t do what we know we should do, and still God is not ready to pounce on us with punishment.  Why not?  Because, Paul writes, God has “great love” for us.  Everyone benefits from that great love.  Being loved is what the human spirit needs more than any material thing.  In fact, God loves us – greatly – even as we are in the middle of the worse moment of our lives, when we are behaving really badly.

Paul says that at that moment, when we had our backs turned on God, God saved us. God rescued us from ourselves and raised us up and seated us in the heavens with Christ Jesus, so very much more than we might dare to expect or even hope for.  Paul calls this “grace”.  Grace is when God gives us what we do not deserve.  God’s plan is to show us the immeasurable riches of grace.

Now, that is amazing…and pretty joyful the more you think about it. I know of no one who finds a child or employee or student who are behaving at their very worst, knowingly being disobedient or disrespectful, and then takes them off to a place filled with joy and showers them with love.  The joy-filled riches of grace are beyond counting, but they are not locked up in a bank, and never tarnish or lose their value.

If fact, God is ready to give us what no human really deserves, and that is to be with God for ever, face to face in real, pure love and joy. Paul makes it clear; we are saved by grace from punishment.  We cannot earn enough bonus points on our credit cards to get a trip to eternity with God.  Paul says it two different ways to make sure we get it: first, “By grace you have been saved through faith,” and second, “It is the gift of God; it is not from our actions or behavior, therefore no one may boast” (no one is better than the others).

Faith without good deeds, of course, is dead, as James wrote in his short letter (read it sometime). Faith is only real and alive in our lives when we are doing the good things that we were created to do.   Paul wrote that God created us for the good works that already are waiting for us to do; we should find meaning and discover our very lives in doing good things.  Grace seems to bring about this desire to act out in love.

People want joy, but they look in all the wrong places. Paul tells us the right place to look.  We find joy when we believe God.  Some people confuse joy with happiness or good circumstances.  But, joy is a gift from God, and not dependent on where you live or beauty or strength or even good health.  Joy is the result of accepting the “great love” of God. We wrap God’s love around us, we feel it, we deeply breath it in, we cling to it when we have nothing else.

Our Gospel reading backs Paul up. It also says that God did not send his Son into the world to condemn or punish us, but that we might be saved through him; and whoever lives in God’s love and joy comes to the light that their good works may be clearly seen as done through God.

So we continue on toward Easter. Ahead is the difficult half of Lent – facing the cruelty and selfishness that sometimes enters the human soul.  We have to admit how low our price is for betrayal, how quickly we let fear overcome us, how we use others for a small moment of gain.  But joy is an act of rebellion against the darkness, and so, for today, we focus on the joy of the triumph of the cross, and the power of love to overcome even death.

It’s Not the Money!

3rd Sunday of Lent 3-4-18

Readings: Exodus 20:1-17; Psalm 19: 8-11, 1 Corthinthians 1:22-25; John 2: 13-25

It’s Not the Money!

I strongly suspect that Jesus’ attitude about money and the accumulation of wealth was very different from the attitudes prevalent in America today.  Remember that Jesus was an itinerary preacher in the 1st Century in Judea – or as we know it, Israel.  We know that he owned no property and seemly had nothing more than the clothes on his back.  In Matthew 8:20, he says, “Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man has nowhere to lay his head.”   He said that in the context of the price of discipleship.  In other words, he had made a choice.  He could have decided to be a craftsman.  Current scholars think that Joseph was not just a crude carpenter, but a skilled artisan who might have worked on some of the larger Roman buildings of the day.  It would have been a good paying job, a respected occupation with steady work.  Jesus was never shy to tell us that discipleship is a choice, and there were social and economic costs associated with discipleship.

But while Jesus did not choose to pursue money, he was fully aware of the cost of what money can do to us. He carefully seemed to avoid having any money at all.  Remember when, in Matthew 17: 24-27, the collectors of the temple tax approached Peter about Jesus paying the tax.  Jesus tells Peter to catch a fish, and Peter finds a coin that will be enough to pay the tax for himself and Jesus.  I doubt that Jesus’ clothing had pockets at all; he had no “pocket change.”

When Jesus watched the people make their contributions in the temple, Mark 12: 41-44, he remarked, “…this poor widow has put in (two pennies), more than all those who have given (greater amounts) to the treasury; for they all put in out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty put in all that she had, her whole livelihood.” He was not impressed with the amount of money which was given, but rather the sacrifice.  Jesus knew that 2 cents is more than $1,000 when it is all you have.

And finally, in Matthew 22: 20-22, the Pharisees attempted to trap Jesus by asking if it was lawful to pay the Roman census tax. His reply was, ““Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” You may say that we owe everything to God, or that that we should pay our taxes, but however you choose to interpret this brilliantly vague response, you know that Jesus was not awake nights worried about money or taxes. Money did not make his top 10 list of important things in life.

With all this being said, I find it hard to focus on the way the money changers in the temple exchanged currency. No doubt they were charging unfair rates.  The historical writings from the 1st century record the political and financial maneuvering and bribes that went into being given permission to have one of those merchant stalls in the temple.  That part of the story would be understandable, at least to us, despite being rather despicable.  Still, it was the same as bank fees and exchange rates for currency in much of our world.  So what was it that set Jesus off?

What was the gross sin of the money changers and the sellers of sheep, oxen and doves? Well, where were they doing business?  For that you need to know something about the temple.  The Outer Court of the Temple in Jerusalem allowed anyone to come in and pray and learn about God.  Only here could Jews converse with non-Jews and foreigners without being ritually unclean.  Only here could faithful Jews tell others about their God, their faith, and beliefs.  It was a place where what we call “evangelism” could take place.  Instead, the noise and the ruckus of the animals and the shameless profiteering prevented any serious conversation or meditation.

The merchants were not only stealing money from people by their excessive rates, but more importantly, they were stealing the knowledge of God from people who had come to learn. They were preventing people from coming to know God, and from praying.  Jesus told us in Luke 19: 10, “For the Son of Man came to seek and save those who are lost.”  So the sin of the merchants was to purposely prevent The Mission of God’s son.  The sin was, for a little money, to come between God and his children.  In Matthew 18:6, we find this description of the sin: “If anyone causes one of …those who believe in me…to stumble, it would be better for them to have a large millstone hung around their neck and to be drowned in the depths of the sea.” No wonder Jesus was so angry.

We have a much larger “Court” than the Outer Court of the Temple where we can pray, and meditate, and talk about God with those who are seeking the divine.  We have much of our nation where it is permissible to talk with people who want to learn, to have their questions answered.  It is a wonderful privilege.  It is, of course,  also a responsibility.  How do we present God?  Such conversations have recently felt more polarized, more political.  God, of course, is not political.  God is a God of love for the poor, a defender of children and those who are unable to provide for themselves.  God is the healer of the broken-hearted, those who have been used and abused.  God is not a God of religion, but a God of faith and trust and truth.   Are we ready to have these conversations in a tender way, with the attitude of a servant of God?

Many thanks to BJ on The River Walk blog for this perspective.

Meditations on the 2nd Sunday of Lent

2nd Sunday of Lent 2-25-18

Genesis 22:1-2, 9a, 10-13, 15-18; Psalm: 116:10, 15-19; Romans 8:31b-34; Mark 9:2-10

Many primitive cultures have practiced human sacrifice, including the ancient tribes in the Middle East. Archeologists tell us that the area outside of Jerusalem, the valley of Gahenna, was once a place where human sacrifice was practiced.  It was a place that provoked great fear. These very early people instinctively knew that to sacrifice a human life was the greatest and most supreme sacrifice that could be made. More grapes and wheat could be grown. More lambs and goats could be bred. But humans came only from the mysterious event of birth.

I am always a little sickened by the story of Abraham being willing to sacrifice his son Isaac. It seems to go against every thing we hold as right and decent as well as everything we believe about a loving God. Even the ending, when the ram appears and is used as the sacrifice, leaves me uneasy about the story. Nevertheless, since we are told that God is good, and since Isaac was a child who was brought to life by a miracle, we should know that Abraham was right to trust God.

Sacrifice was a significant ritual for the Jewish people. Historians tell us that the blood from the lambs ran in red rivers down the streets of Jerusalem from the temple during Passover. We usually think of gifts as benefiting the person they are given to. At Passover, animals were sacrificed so that the givers could receive something valuable; as a community they recalled being protected from the plagues God put on the Egyptians, and thereby were freed from slavery and lead into the Promised Land. Animal sacrifice ended when the Temple was destroyed, only some 30 years after the crucifixion of Jesus, but a ritualized image of sacrifice remains in our own Mass.

The Lectionary uses all this to set the tone, to prepare us to think deeply about the crucifixion, which occurred at Passover. It is framed in the immensity of the thought of a loving and all-powerful God willingly sacrificing his son to a frenzied mob motivated by little more than silver coins and the desire for power. That mob continues to haunt us; too much of human interaction is still mob mentality, where superficial information and ignorance leave people open to faulty conclusions and horrific actions.

It is not hard to understand why Pontius Pilot handed over Jesus to the mob to be crucified – giving them what they wanted was the only way to avoid a full-blown riot. The worst part of the Good Friday reading of the Passion is when the congregation is expected to read the words the crowd spoke: “Crucify Him, Crucify Him!” At that point, I always say a prayer that I will never be part of a mob chanting like that.

I recently heard from a woman who had lost both her husband and her only daughter within 2 months. Naturally, she was in shock. Among other things, I suggested that she lean on the Blessed Mother, because she too, as a widow, had lost her precious child in the most terrible of circumstances.   It was an image that helped this grieving woman.

Likewise, the Lectionary gives us the story of Abraham and Isaac to help us understand the idea of God losing his precious and sinless son to mob who had no respect for his life. At the same time, our Gospel reading reassures us that Jesus was, indeed, the Son of God. Jesus is transfigured, and his clothes become an unearthly dazzling white; he talks with Elijah and Moses. God says Jesus is “my beloved Son.” Afterwards, Jesus warns his disciples not to tell anyone about this except when the “Son of Man had risen from the dead,” which confuses the disciples even more.

So what are we to take away from this muddle of sacrifice and death, alongside transfiguration? The Abraham story assures us that God’s promises can be trusted, even when the situation is dire. Indeed, the children of Abraham did become as many as the stars in the sky, through his son Isaac.   The transfiguration story is also to build trust for the apostles, because very shortly their faith will be badly shaken. Jesus is the son of God and will rise from the dead. The apostles could trust in this message from God, as can we, for the risen Christ is the primary foundation of Christianity. If the 2nd Sunday of Lent were to have a name, it would be “trust”. This Lent, let us set aside our fears of the future, and trust that Creator, Son and Holy Sprit will be with us as we travel together through these 40 days leading to Easter Morning, and beyond.