Truth Comes To Us With Joy

Pentecost  May 20, 2018

Acts 2:1-11;  Psalms 104; 1 Corinthians 12:3b-7, 12-13;  John 15:26-27, 16:12-15

 

This is probably my favorite Sunday of the year. That may seem like a strange thing to say, given most people would choose Christmas or Easter.  But when you think about it, Christmas is the birth of Jesus, the joyful day we celebrate that God came to earth to be with us.   And Pentecost is the day that the Holy Spirit came to be with us on earth.

So why did the Holy Spirit come and what does the Holy Spirit do? Good questions!

Jesus says that the Holy Spirit is the Spirit of truth and that the Spirit comes to us personally to tell us the truth. The Holy Spirit is the “Advocate”.  That title gives us some clues of what the Spirit does.  An advocate is a supporter or defender.  When we are having a difficult time, it’s really good to have a supporter.  A supporter tells you the truth about how you’re doing.  A supporter says things like, “That was really good.  Your hard work is really paying off and you’re really improving.”  A defender says things like, “Don’t worry about someone laughing at you.  You’re doing the right thing.  I will stand with you no matter what.” We all need supporters and defenders in our life.

An advocate also does things like ask if we can have a second chance to do something. An advocate really believes that we can learn to do things right after we have made a mess of something.  An Advocate prays and intercedes for us.

Let’s look more closely at our Gospel. Jesus says that the Spirit “proceeds from the Father.”  This is not to be confused with the theology of our Apostle’s Creed.  The point of what he is saying here is that the disciples… and all Christians… need the help of the Spirit as we share the Gospel in the world around us.  The Spirit “will testify” the truth to Jesus, and the disciples “will (also) testify” the truth to everyone around them – because they had heard the truth directly from Jesus all the time they had been with him.  We then carry that Truth forward, generation to generation.  WE can testify/ give witness/ share this truth because the Spirit is sent to us to personally tell us the Truth.

In Acts 1:8 Jesus says, “You shall receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you, and you will be my witnesses.” The image that comes to mind is one of being in court on the witness stand, having sworn on the Bible to tell the truth. We live in the “court” of the world, where we are witnesses about the Truth of Jesus.  We can do this with confidence only because we have the assurance that the Spirit does not speak on its own.  What the Spirit speaks is exactly what the Creator has spoken.

When Jesus tells us that the Spirit “will declare to you the things that are coming,” he is telling us in yet another way that the truth the Spirit tells us is from God. There are many verses in the Old Testament, such as Isaiah 46:9, which state that only God can declare the future.  Declaring things to come is not a privilege that false gods have.  An example is the dream Joseph had to take Mary and the Christ child to Egypt; God knew that Bethlehem would not be a safe place for them in the near future.

Jesus really presses this all home as he prepares to leave his disciples.   It would be normal and natural if we felt we could not possibly understand everything we need to know to share the Truth of God fully and correctly.  And Jesus assured the disciples, that there was more to know; he said, (there is) “much more” or “still many things” to learn, and we are just not able to learn it all at once.  That is why the Spirit stays with us, to guide us along the “way of truth”, reminding us that Jesus told us, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life.” (John 14:6)

We cannot begin to understand or even image all that Jesus did for us, until we live our lives, mature, experience many things, pray, and study the scriptures. As we grow in our faith, we grow in our ability to understand what seemed impossible when we were children or new in the faith.  “I have more to tell you” is a promise that we will have a deeper and fuller faith as time passes.  The things we cannot accept at one time are the things we may find to be a source of real consolation later.  God knows and has always known all truth; we struggle to grasp truth by bits and pieces at a time.  The Spirit is there to give us the precise truth we need at the moment we need it.  We might think of it in terms of always being fed the ideal food our bodies need in the exact way we will most enjoy at every single meal.

Then Jesus says, “(The Spirit) will glorify me, because he will take from what is mine and declare it you. I get confused when I read that.  When we glorify someone, we given them honor or high praise; it also means to worship someone as greater than ourselves.  We make clear our praise by doing something people can hear or see, like clapping our hands or bowing, by giving our very best things as a gift.  We glorify God when we worship, by kneeling or bowing or giving thanks, and also by sharing what we believe with other people and encouraging them to glorify God.  Likewise, the Spirit glorifies Christ by sharing with us the truth that we in turn share with our neighbors.  It becomes, not a duty or a burden, but a great honor and a privilege to be able to share the faith.

And this completes a pattern we have seen over the last three weeks. 2 weeks ago we talked about being chosen by God and remaining in Jesus.  Last week we read that as Jesus ascended, he told us to “Go into the whole world and proclaim the gospel to every creature.”  Now, Jesus sends us the Spirit from God to better enable us to awaken our neighbors that they too have been chosen.  The Spirit remains with us so that we might grow in awareness of the teachings of Jesus and the fullness of truth in God.  In turn, we honor God as the Spirit honors Jesus.

May the truth which the Spirit speaks to you fill you with joy.

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Homily, Feast of the Ascension-May 13, 2018

Jesus Christ Answers Doubts of Saint ThomasOne thing that is hard to realize is that the Ascension is really a part of the Easter event. Christ in dying brought his humanity and divinity into a risen and ascended state. The gospels and Acts depict different instances of Jesus heavenly ascension. Key to keep in mind for the Ascension is what the whole Easter event calls out. The word is “wait.” Look around today and think for a moment. Waiting is probably the most irritating thing we do. Patience is something we like to see others practice, and we like to do whatever right away. But what was Jesus’ message the whole time through the whole Easter event? It was wait for the Holy Spirit.Jesus Christ Answers Doubts of Saint Thomas

Even today, we need to take that to heart. Throughout history, the church, or well-meaning members of the church have acted or done things that were contrary to Jesus’ teaching or unfair or just wrong. It is difficult for individuals sometimes to ascension3wait, to listen, to discern the Holy Spirit’s intention. Life’s choice and activities can be complicated and difficult. Occasionally, we can be faced with almost life changing choices. At such times, it is well if we’re used to withdrawing and opening our hearts to the Spirit. So we are reminded today once again that Christ is risen and his Spirit is among us if we have the patience to wait.

Chosen to Remain

6th Sunday of  Easter, May 6, 2018

Acts 10:25-26, 34-35, 44-48; Ps 98:1-4; 1 John 4:7-10; John 15:9-17

 

I would like to focus today on just two words in our Gospel reading. The first word we will focus on is “chose”, in the next to the last sentence: “It was not you who chose me but I who chose you…”

The first thing that comes to my mind is when we played kick ball in elementary school gym class. Two team captains would be chosen by the gym teacher.  Then those team captains would take turns choosing kids to be on their team.  Me? Well, I was never big or strong or very good at sports.   Both captains, of course wanted a team that could win the game.  So, I was always one of the last ones chosen.

We often choose our friends because they will agree with us or share their candy bars with us, and it is easy to think God chose us because we remembered to say our prayers or we didn’t say bad words. Some people might even think that they are like team captains and they are in charge of doing the choosing.  They might feel like Jesus is sitting around, waiting for them to choose him.

But instead, Jesus tells us that He already chose us. It would seem that he chose us even before we were born. St Paul wrote in Ephesians 1: 4 that Jesus chose us before the beginning of the world, that we should be holy and without sin.  This is far, far different from the idea of Jesus waiting for us, or even thinking it was just “luck” that we were chosen.  That’s not how God works.  God chooses each and every person, and loves each person as if they were the only person. In fact, God chooses us all.  In the very first sentence of our reading Jesus says, “As God loves me, so I also love you.”  Jesus was talking to all of his disciples, and he is talking to all of us.  God loves each and every person, each one in their own way, and since God is love and love is from God and God created love (that is in the 2nd reading), God is able to- and chooses to – love each and every person.

The second word we are going to focus on today is “remain.” In the Gospel, Jesus says, “Remain in me, and I remain in you.”  We might say, “Remain with me, stick around for I while, I like being with you.”   But that isn’t quite the same thing.  Think of this, we sometimes say, “I am really into ice hockey.  My favorite team is the Capitals and I am so into watching every single game.”  We want to “remain” in front of the TV during all the playoff games, eating in front of the TV, wearing our team jersey, thinking “hockey, hockey, hockey!”

Ah, now it makes sense, Jesus wants us to love him that much, that we always think about Jesus, Jesus, Jesus! We always want to be with Jesus, we want to learn more about Jesus, we want to read about Jesus, we want to talk to other people about Jesus because we are so in to Jesus….and that is the way Jesus feels about us.  Jesus is the friend who never moves away, never forgets, never likes someone else better, always tells us the truth, and forever loves us.  Jesus remains in our lives, even when we miss the puck by a mile.

I knew a man once who had trouble loving. The presents he gave his wife that were things that he wanted.  He never bought her things she wanted.  For Christmas he bought her a vacuum cleaner, because he wanted her to keep the house clean.  He bought her a waffle maker for Valentines Day because he wanted her to make waffles for his breakfast.  For her birthday he bought her a big new TV so he could watch hockey.  He didn’t understand why she was so mad at him.  So she made a rule: he couldn’t give her any gifts that had an electric cord, no gifts that could be plugged in.  Gifts had to be jewelry or flowers or things that were for her to enjoy.

Jesus gave us a rule, too, to help us understand. Here is the rule:  “Love one another.”  It’s the last sentence of our reading.  It is a very simple rule, just three words.  But now that we understand about God and Jesus and love, it might not sound so easy to do, because the rule says we have to love people who might not love us back, or people who aren’t very loveable.  It doesn’t mean they’re our best friends and we want to hang out with them, but it means we have to be kind, be generous, pray for them, maybe even listen to them talk when we don’t necessarily agree with them.  Maybe give them a pencil in math class when they don’t have one, knowing they wouldn’t do the same for us.  Maybe you can pick them for your team, to give them a chance to play.  Maybe you can stand up for them when your friends are picking on them.  We can love them like God loves – love them when they need love, not just when they deserve it.

So here is what we learned today: You have been chosen by God, and God loves you with a love beyond your imagination. Jesus will remain in you, and wants you to remain in him.  The way to remain in Jesus is to love Jesus, and love other people, too.

Homily April 29, 2018 the 5th Sunday of Easter

5 easter 4St. Paul was a Pharisee who was totally committed to the ruling group. His devoutness and devotedness set him apart in wanting to quickly rid Israel of what he saw as a new and dangerous cult called Christians. To him, they are going against the law and prophet and teaching a new way, teaching a resurrection, and even replacing the Torah. To him, 5 easterthey were trying to replace everything. As a result he took action by getting “warrants” to arrest these Christians and set out for Damascus. It was on that road where he met Jesus, and he was never the same again. His encounter on the way totally life changing. It is then that he learns and believes in Jesus and becomes an avid follower. Yet, in our first reading, we see the difficulty he has of being accepted. Ultimately, he was and of course took Christ’s teaching and went far and wide and spread the seeds or shoots of the vine where ever he went. .

Today that vine of our third reading remains and the fruit it bears depends on the care that we ourselves have given it. This means we must work at it. What it produce requires our attention. Christ calls every day, we respond with our attention and prayer. It’s as 5 easter 3easy as lifting our heart or mind and doing the right thing. We are called to make those choices every day.The start of a healthy vine and a Christian is with their self.  our personal relationship with God and our relationships and interactions with others determines the health of the vine and our worthiness as part of it. We all know the challenges of the relationships and are called to be Christ like in our daily life.